Category Archives: Episode Guide

“Ultraman Eve Festival” 3

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With Eiji Tsuburaya (center), cast members and monsters (Antler’s back-to-front body costume is noticeable)

Anyway, it’s imaginable how excited kid audiences were when they saw Ultraman monsters for the first time though Chandler’s costume was the one remodeled from Peguila.

And, moreover, Ultraman as a totally brand new superhero no one had ever seen before.

It’s said that a series of mess-ups occurred during the shooting of the live stage show in front of an audience probably because it was the first attempt.

 

Satoshi (Bin) Furuya (original Ultraman actor) says he stumbled and fell on the stage due to the poor visibility as the mask didn’t have eye holes large enough yet.

He just barely performed battles with monsters in such a situation.

When seeing the video, looks like he made his movements like karate, which is one of his specialties.

He says that the scene in which he returned to the stage wing hung on wires didn’t do well either due to an accident.

 

I hear Garamon also stumbled and fell over an electric cable or something so the head of the costume accidentally came off.

It’s well known among fans that you can see Antler wear its body costume back to front.  🙂

But the festival received quite a positive response from kid audiences and made them so much excited.

It was broadcast after the mess-up scenes were trimmed and edited overnight.

And the program marked a viewing rate over 30%.


“Ultraman Eve Festival” 2

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Ultraman battling with Red King and Chandlar

Following yesterday’s post, let me talk about “Ultraman Zenyasai (Eve Festival); Ultraman Tanjo (Birth of Ultraman).”

Surprisingly, looks like the festival was held from 1 p.m. on July 9 in 1966, just one day before the broadcasting on July 10.

The festival went on along with the appearance of then popular comedians Nonsense Trio, SSSP members and monsters of preceding “Ultra Q” and its sequel “Ultraman.”

 

Garamon, Kanegon and M1 as Ultra Q monsters and Alien Baltan, Antler, Chandlar (remodeled from Ultra Q’s Peguila) and Red King as Ultraman monsters can be seen live in the video.

During the battle between Ultra Q monsters and Ultraman monsters, SSSP members and, finally, Ultraman were set to appear to fight against them.

Eiji Tsuburaya also showed up in front of the audience at last.

It’s said that he was unwilling to show life-sized monsters to kids as they were supposed to be much much bigger.

But he was eventually talked into it as there was no choice.

 

The producers initially wanted to broadcast Episode 1 of “Ultraman” one week earlier by dropping the final episode of “Ultra Q.”

But the belated shooting of Episode 1 made it impossible.

Actually looks like the film of Episode 1 was delivered to TBS (broadcasting station of Ultra Series) just barely in time for the broadcasting on July 17.

We can learn how the production was going under time pressure at the time.


“Ultraman Eve Festival” 1

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Title saying “Birth of Ultraman”

As described yesterday, “Open Up!” which was the final episode of “Ultra Q” was put on hold because it was assumed that children would have difficulties to understand the story.

So it was shown on a rerun for the first time.

It’s likely that children of the time who watched the rerun were surprised that the unseen final episode suddenly showed up.

I feel like I dimly remember it though I’m not sure.

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Children and their parents in Suginami Public Hall

As “Ultra Q” consisted of self-contained episodes featuring the same human characters, it didn’t affect the entire story throughout the series even without the final episode.

The producers seemingly didn’t want to put a damper on the growing popularity of monsters fueled by those of “Ultra Q” by broadcasting its final episode featuring no monster.

And they hastily plotted a program titled “Ultraman Zenyasai (Eve Festival); Ultraman Tanjo (Birth of Ultraman).”

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Ultraman showed up before people for the first time!

It was shot in Suginami Kokaido (public hall in Suginami, Tokyo) with live audiences and broadcast on July 10, 1966 instead of “Open Up!” of “Ultra Q” one week before the actual start of “Ultraman.”

I didn’t remember this monochrome program at all (I was four years old then) and saw it on video in my adulthood.

Anyway, it was exactly an historical and memorable day when Ultraman showed up before the public first time ever.